Welcome to the side hustle

I suspect I don’t look like the ‘usual’ person who opts for flexible working. I’m not a mother, other than to my two adorable little cats of course. I don’t have any caring responsibilities, other than to myself. I’m now a Director so I’m in a senior role at work but still ‘climbing the ladder’, and I’m also not formally studying.

But over the past few months, two things have changed that led me to ask for flexible working as part of taking a new role. The first is that my emerging sense that the traditional model of work just isn’t working – which I have blogged about a bit before – has really taken hold. I don’t love a 9 to 5. I’m not a morning person and I operate poorly on short sleep, which really struck home when I read Matthew Walker’s brilliant book ‘Why We Sleep’ (see ‘In defence of night owls’). I also like some more flexibility in my routine, be it to do a yoga class at 8am, to attend an interesting day-time event or simply to complete the never ending cycle of chores that come with having a home.

The second is the realisation that my day-job isn’t my only passion and it doesn’t provide me with my full purpose in the way it did in my twenties, when I was quite frankly a complete workaholic and also completely fulfilled – for the me at that age – by my full time job. It doesn’t necessarily mean I enjoy my work any less, but I do want time to explore other interests. I attended an incredible women in leadership summit recently called Reach, founded by Sky Sports presenter Sarah Stirk, and quite a few of the eighty-odd women who attended had a side-hustle. They loved their careers but they had other things too. I was inspired.

So, other interests. I am increasingly fascinated by the world of digital healthcare, and recently decided I wanted to start volunteering at a hospital to get some hands on experience and give back. There’s also an exciting new project that has come my way – which I will keep quiet about while its being formed but watch this space…. Plus I want to give my writing some more consistent dedicated time. So all in all quite a few things I want to try on the side and see which ones stick.

I have been trying to write whilst working full-time but its not really been working for me when I’m confined to evenings and weekends (see earlier point about not being a morning person; no pre-work writing for me). So I realised if I wanted to try side-hustling properly I needed to try a different kind of sacrifice and make the time. Hence the four day week.

Continue reading

More than meets the eye

Diversity – and equality – is something I think about a lot. I am very biased, but I was fortunate enough to be raised by a brilliant feminist mother, who proudly sports a t-shirt proclaiming “This is what a feminist looks like”. As a result I developed a deep-set, unshakeable and core belief early on that there should be equality between men and women. And perhaps given I am also a woman, when I think about diversity and equality I tend to focus on gender.

Recently though I’ve been part of a few conversations about other kinds of diversity, parts of our identity that may not be visible to the eye but that can be just as important. Its been genuinely thought-provoking.

The first was centred around the concept of need. As I’ve mentioned on here many times, I’m a Trustee of an amazing charity Young Women’s Trust, which helps young women trapped in low or no pay. In the years I’ve been working with the charity I’m still struck by the number of young women we help who, on paper, don’t meet the traditional definition of being ‘needy’. They may well have a degree, come from lower middle income homes. But after graduation they find themselves unable to secure work, falling into a soul-destroying downwards cycle of weekly trips to the Job Centre, whilst claiming benefits and sending out countless C.V’s not to get even a single acknowledgement back. The repercussions on mental health, self-esteem and well-being are horrific.

I was moved to tears by a recent anonymous YWT case study by a woman who suffered awful childhood abuse, spent her teens battling depression, anxiety and self-harm, stuck on long waiting lists to get help. But she did well at school and then at university. In her own words:

“My academic record disguised the carnage that was my private life…I had a series of abusive relationships…violence and abuse had been part of my life for so long that I didn’t even recognise there was a problem.”

Continue reading