To pay rise or not to pay rise, that is the question

Hot on the heels of yesterday’s blog post¬†about women on boards, and the frankly ridiculous things a few people appointing – or rather not appointing –¬† women onto boards said, I wanted to touch on the issue of gender pay.

This has clearly been a hot topic recently with the Government’s introduction of mandatory gender pay reporting, although post some high profile media coverage – which seemed to focus on a few big companies and criticism of the ways the reporting has been structured – it feels a bit like its fallen away.

I have been very fortunate to formally and informally mentor a few exceptional women in recent years and consistently, unsurprisingly, navigating promotions and pay arise as constant themes. Regardless of gender, it is clearly something that comes up again and again whilst working.

A lot has been written about gender differences in pay. The survey my charity Young Women’s Trust did of 800 HR professionals actually found that the majority (67%) didn’t think there was a difference between men and women in relation to ambition, though 25% did think men were more ambitious. In relation to asking for pay rises though, the number who thought gender didn’t make a difference dropped to 51%, with 39% saying male employees were more likely to speak up.

Some light Google-based research shows that the actual evidence about gender-based differences in approaches to pay is more of a mixed bag. A study by the University of Wisconsin, Warwick and the Cass Business School found no difference in the likelihood of asking for a pay rise between genders, but you can also find articles citing studies, like one from global market research firm Mintel published earlier this year, which found that women report being half as confident as men at asking for more pay.

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